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billyweeds
Posted: Sun May 17, 2020 3:26 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20507 Location: New York City
bartist--Wow. Three for three, we both agree. (I can't even recommend the last one and the other two are awful.)
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bartist
Posted: Sun May 17, 2020 4:59 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010 Posts: 6560
If I'm honest, I'd say I'm eminently unqualified to review that last one, because I tend to struggle with allegory as a genre. My guess is that the Saramago novel "Double" on which "Enemy" was based would be far more illuminating. And more coherent, but that's only a guess.

I will get round to "I See You" - had heard that it was nicely twisty, if lacking nuance. Ms Hunt has been fending off Nazis, and doing a fine job, in the current PBS/BBC series World on Fire which my wife is really into. I was drawn in more by Leslie Manville, who plays a rather conflicted and snotty mother of a British soldier whose gotten himself into a romantic mess. This is the series in which Sean Bean doesn't die.

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billyweeds
Posted: Mon May 18, 2020 9:23 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20507 Location: New York City
Leslie Manville is a great actor(tress). Helen Hunt is very okay.
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gromit
Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 1:18 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 31 Aug 2004 Posts: 8715 Location: Shanghai
Watched a bunch of old romantic comedies where Audrey Hepburn is sweet and charming and paired up with some rather aging leading men. Sabrina finds 25 year old AH with Bogart; Ariane/Love in the Afternoon has 27 year old AH marry an old-looking Gary Cooper; and then the later Charade where Hepburn is around 33 and hooks up with grey-haired Cary Grant. Not surprisingly, Grant is the only one who can pull this off.

What was this all about?
Is it just the middle-aged screenwriter/producer fantasy that a great looking young woman would find someone of their type attractive? Or was Audrey Hepburn perceived as too classy for the newcrop of moody young stars, and her class seemed like a throwback that matched with the older generation? Both?

Anyway, kinda creepy. And it didn't help that the film I watched in the middle was The Major & the Minor, where Ginger Rogers pretends to be 11 (12 next week), and gets hit on by a whole army of men and boys.


Last edited by gromit on Wed May 27, 2020 2:09 am; edited 1 time in total

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Syd
Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 6:25 pm Reply with quote
Site Admin Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 12596 Location: Norman, Oklahoma
I've heard it said that there was a shortage of leading men of the right type, so yeah. Although she did have William Holden, who was in his mid thirties at the time of "Roman Holiday."

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Syd
Posted: Tue May 26, 2020 6:56 pm Reply with quote
Site Admin Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 12596 Location: Norman, Oklahoma
The Steel Helmet is Samuel Fuller's first major film and also the first major film set during the Korean War. Like a lot of Fuller's films, he didn't have a huge budget, so he created an intimate movie about the experiences of survivors from various units combining in the face of a major North Korean invasion. Much of the later part of the film is set in a Buddhist temple which is a character in itself. (Most of the scenes take place in a forest set or the temple.) No name actors I noticed, and considering that the lead actor is Gene Evans, who was usually a supporting type outside of Fuller films, I wouldn't expect any. He's playing a grizzled sergeant whose unit was slaughtered and is made for the part.

Quite effective, and worth a shot. Fuller was in the infantry himself and used his experiences in the film.

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billyweeds
Posted: Wed May 27, 2020 4:32 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20507 Location: New York City
Syd wrote:
I've heard it said that there was a shortage of leading men of the right type, so yeah. Although she did have William Holden, who was in his mid thirties at the time of "Roman Holiday."


Don't know whether you meant this or not, but William Holden was NOT in "Roman Holiday." It was Gregory Peck.
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billyweeds
Posted: Wed May 27, 2020 4:32 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20507 Location: New York City
Syd wrote:
The Steel Helmet is Samuel Fuller's first major film and also the first major film set during the Korean War. Like a lot of Fuller's films, he didn't have a huge budget, so he created an intimate movie about the experiences of survivors from various units combining in the face of a major North Korean invasion. Much of the later part of the film is set in a Buddhist temple which is a character in itself. (Most of the scenes take place in a forest set or the temple.) No name actors I noticed, and considering that the lead actor is Gene Evans, who was usually a supporting type outside of Fuller films, I wouldn't expect any. He's playing a grizzled sergeant whose unit was slaughtered and is made for the part.

Quite effective, and worth a shot. Fuller was in the infantry himself and used his experiences in the film.


Saw "The Steel Helmet." Really excellent.
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Syd
Posted: Wed May 27, 2020 5:21 pm Reply with quote
Site Admin Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 12596 Location: Norman, Oklahoma
billyweeds wrote:
Syd wrote:
I've heard it said that there was a shortage of leading men of the right type, so yeah. Although she did have William Holden, who was in his mid thirties at the time of "Roman Holiday."


Don't know whether you meant this or not, but William Holden was NOT in "Roman Holiday." It was Gregory Peck.


That's right, Holden was in "Sabrina" with Hepburn and Bogart. Peck was also in his mid-thirties.

Fred Astaire was in his late fifties when he starred opposite Hepburn in "Funny Face."

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gromit
Posted: Thu May 28, 2020 4:41 am Reply with quote
Joined: 31 Aug 2004 Posts: 8715 Location: Shanghai
A weird aspect of Sabrina is that it draws attention to the age difference.
She starts off infatuated with Holden who is reasonably close to her age, but then falls for his older brother Bogart who looks a lot older than Holden.

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bartist
Posted: Thu May 28, 2020 11:40 am Reply with quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010 Posts: 6560
Recent views

The End of All things - grotesque but beautifully shot art film set in a post-apocalyptic Wales. It's about how humans need to believe in something unseen, and has some provocative and haunting moments. Until it degenerates into a rather misogynistic plot line and murder and cannibalism. One is also called upon to believe that the apocalypse has caused a climate where it rarely rains and the sun never shines, yet Wales has kept up with photosynthesis and stayed remarkably green. It doesn't matter, it's more allegory than sci-fi.

The Old Man and the Gun - Robert Redford as the famous "gentleman bank robber" Forrest Tucker* which Redford said would be his swan song. Bob turns 84 this summer, so I can almost believe him.
He's great, as are his robbery assistants Tom Waits and Danny Glover, and the whole ensemble has some fun with what is a fairly predictable plot, and the overall sedate tone allows for the emergence of Redfordian charm.

Virus - a Japanese film, 1982, full of American 60/70s TV actors, in which cheesiness ratchets up to levels usually found only in cheese factories. Every so often it cuts away from sweating men in submarines or distraught scientists in labs or sinister German agents to women in a Tokyo topless bar, presumably so we can learn how the pandemic virus impacts all facets of quotidian life. Despite this attempt to stimulate my lower chakras, I drifted to sleep somewhere around minute 50. One scene, though I was barely awake so I could be wrong, seemed to present Antarctica as having trees.
Hmm.





* Maybe that's why he liked aliases so much. A man can only take so many F Troop jokes, right?

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