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marantzo
Posted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:02 pm Reply with quote
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whiskeypriest wrote:
Syd wrote:
The score won the Oscar in 1972, twenty years after the movie was released, but the year the film went into wide release in the United States.
And won it primarily because the most notable score of the year was declared ineligible.


What was that?
billyweeds
Posted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:09 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20554 Location: New York City
marantzo wrote:
whiskeypriest wrote:
Syd wrote:
The score won the Oscar in 1972, twenty years after the movie was released, but the year the film went into wide release in the United States.
And won it primarily because the most notable score of the year was declared ineligible.


What was that?


Had to be The Godfather, right? Ineligible because part of it had been used previously. How lame.

"Eternally" (a.k.a. "Theme from Limelight") is ultra-saccharine and soppy. Just like "This Is My Song," Chaplin's awful theme to A Countess from Hong Kong, which Petula Clark's popularity made into a semi-hit.

Oh, love, this is my song.
This is a song, a serenade to you.
The world cannot be wrong
If in this world there's you.
I care not what the world may say.
Without your love there'd be no day.
Oh, love, this is my song.
This is a song, a serenade to you.


Chaplin was not a great songwriter, to put it mildly.


Last edited by billyweeds on Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:25 pm; edited 1 time in total
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marantzo
Posted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 8:24 pm Reply with quote
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I didn't know that The Godfather score was disqualified. Does that mean that scores which have bits with Beethoven or Mozart etc. would be ineligible because they were used before?
whiskeypriest
Posted: Sat Dec 11, 2010 1:59 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 6916 Location: "It's a Dry Heat."
marantzo wrote:
I didn't know that The Godfather score was disqualified. Does that mean that scores which have bits with Beethoven or Mozart etc. would be ineligible because they were used before?
Actually, yes. There is some question whether the scores for Black Swan and True Grit, to name two, will be eligible this year because the scores contain elements taken from existing work. There Will Be Blood's score was ineligible for that reason.

In The Godfather's case, the composer used a theme he had used in a previous movie.

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whiskeypriest
Posted: Sat Dec 11, 2010 12:06 pm Reply with quote
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For what it is worth, the scores for King's Speech and The Social Network are also both possibly ineligible due to excessive use of existing music. Only about half of the scores submitted to the academy last year were deemed eligible for the Oscar.

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billyweeds
Posted: Sun Dec 12, 2010 10:44 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20554 Location: New York City
One other seriously overlooked film is Spartan, the only first-rate film directed by David Mamet and one of Mamet's two best works, the other being the stage version of Glengarry Glen Ross.

Spartan
is a crackling action flick with Val Kilmer at his peak and a labyrinthine plot that pays off big time. Kilmer reminds me here of what DiCaprio strives for but almost never achieves, a sort of thinking man's hunk with action chops.
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Marj
Posted: Sun Dec 12, 2010 2:46 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 10497 Location: Manhattan
Quote:
Chaplin was not a great songwriter, to put it mildly.


Billy, I have to disagree. I'm not referring to his themes, but he wrote most of the scores to his earlier films. Background music, if you will. He could not notate, so had people like David Raskin, Alfred Newman et.al., help him out. But if you go back to films like The Kid, City Lights and Modern Times, those scores were all Chaplin.
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marantzo
Posted: Sun Dec 12, 2010 4:46 pm Reply with quote
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Marj, I think Billy meant the lyrics when he said songwriter, not necessarily the tune, though he might have meant both.
billyweeds
Posted: Sun Dec 12, 2010 9:11 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20554 Location: New York City
marantzo wrote:
Marj, I think Billy meant the lyrics when he said songwriter, not necessarily the tune, though he might have meant both.


I meant "songwriter," not composer. Though I must admit I find the music somewhat similar from movie to movie. But it's mainly the lyrics. They largely stink.
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marantzo
Posted: Tue Dec 28, 2010 9:19 am Reply with quote
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OK, this wasn't an overlooked movie, it was looked and smeared.

Ishtar
was not bad at all. Not great by any stretch, but enjoyable and very funny in parts. Why it got such a bashing is ridiculous. Probably because it cost an arm and a leg and it had two mega-stars as the leads.
bartist
Posted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 11:48 am Reply with quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010 Posts: 6635 Location: Black Hills
Yeah, I think it was massively expensive and all you got was an okay comedy, so people were disgruntled.

I'll check out Spartan, BW, thanks for mentioning it. I've sort of been missing Val Kilmer these days.

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marantzo
Posted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 1:52 pm Reply with quote
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Linked to another thread. The 1956 version of 1984 with Edmond O'Brien and Jan Sterling is way overlooked. In fact pretty well completely unknown. It's an excellent movie that puts the novel on screen without losing a bit of it's impact. I was first introduced to 1984 by a radio play that I caught when I was 13 or 14. I used to have the radio on when I was doing my homework at my desk. Inevitably I would listen to the radio programmes and never did finish my homework. 1984 absolutely stunned me. What a frightening tale, with "Oranges and lemons, Says the bells of St. Clements" playing at different times in the background providing a creepy and ironic context to the happenings. That song, the antisex league, Big Brother watching, the ubiquity of undercover agents, one in particular who is so deep undercover that you think he is real good guy, room 101 and the terror that forces one to rat out (literally and figuratively) his love has never left my memory. From there I read the book and around ten years later I caught the movie on TV. All three were perfect explications of the story.

Like Of Mice and Men I had seen the original and had no desire to see a remake.
Joe Vitus
Posted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 4:31 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 14498 Location: Houston
billyweeds wrote:
marantzo wrote:
Marj, I think Billy meant the lyrics when he said songwriter, not necessarily the tune, though he might have meant both.


I meant "songwriter," not composer. Though I must admit I find the music somewhat similar from movie to movie. But it's mainly the lyrics. They largely stink.


I quite like "Smile."

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Joe Vitus
Posted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 4:35 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 14498 Location: Houston
marantzo wrote:
Linked to another thread. The 1956 version of 1984 with Edmond O'Brien and Jan Sterling is way overlooked. In fact pretty well completely unknown. It's an excellent movie that puts the novel on screen without losing a bit of it's impact. I was first introduced to 1984 by a radio play that I caught when I was 13 or 14. I used to have the radio on when I was doing my homework at my desk. Inevitably I would listen to the radio programmes and never did finish my homework. 1984 absolutely stunned me. What a frightening tale, with "Oranges and lemons, Says the bells of St. Clements" playing at different times in the background providing a creepy and ironic context to the happenings. That song, the antisex league, Big Brother watching, the ubiquity of undercover agents, one in particular who is so deep undercover that you think he is real good guy, room 101 and the terror that forces one to rat out (literally and figuratively) his love has never left my memory. From there I read the book and around ten years later I caught the movie on TV. All three were perfect explications of the story.

Like Of Mice and Men I had seen the original and had no desire to see a remake.


You are, literally, the first person I've ever known to like this movie. And yours is the only positive review of it I've seen in print.

Personally, I think the book is way overrated (Asimov wrote a great couple of articles tearing down the premises), so I've never watched any of the adaptations.

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billyweeds
Posted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 4:39 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20554 Location: New York City
Joe Vitus wrote:
marantzo wrote:
Linked to another thread. The 1956 version of 1984 with Edmond O'Brien and Jan Sterling is way overlooked. In fact pretty well completely unknown. It's an excellent movie that puts the novel on screen without losing a bit of it's impact. I was first introduced to 1984 by a radio play that I caught when I was 13 or 14. I used to have the radio on when I was doing my homework at my desk. Inevitably I would listen to the radio programmes and never did finish my homework. 1984 absolutely stunned me. What a frightening tale, with "Oranges and lemons, Says the bells of St. Clements" playing at different times in the background providing a creepy and ironic context to the happenings. That song, the antisex league, Big Brother watching, the ubiquity of undercover agents, one in particular who is so deep undercover that you think he is real good guy, room 101 and the terror that forces one to rat out (literally and figuratively) his love has never left my memory. From there I read the book and around ten years later I caught the movie on TV. All three were perfect explications of the story.

Like Of Mice and Men I had seen the original and had no desire to see a remake.


You are, literally, the first person I've ever known to like this movie. And yours is the only positive review of it I've seen in print.

Personally, I think the book is way overrated (Asimov wrote a great couple of articles tearing down the premises), so I've never watched any of the adaptations.


Joe--You and I are on the very same page. I think 1984 is boring, and this comes from someone who counts Animal Farm as one of his favorite books, so I'm not anti-Orwell. Far from it.

O'Brien and Sterling, both of whom I often admire elsewhere, are wasted in the movie version of 1984.
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