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jeremy
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 5:53 am Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 6794 Location: Derby, England and Hamilton, New Zealand (yes they are about 12,000 miles apart)
Overall, I don’t think Pulp Fiction is that violent? No part of Pulp Fiction was as discomfiting as the ear cutting scene in Tarantino’s first film, Reservoir Dogs. The effect violence has on us all depends on the context rather than the level of gore – I think my children understand that The Simpsons’ Itchy and Scratchy are a satire, but I suspect that they would love it regardless.

Only one moment that troubled me in Pulp Fiction. I enjoyed the pure cool and comedy of Vincent and Jules going about there work – don’t we all enjoy seeing professionals doing what they do best, lapping up the trade craft and loving their assurance – and even the violence in the pawn shop was heavily stylised – but I was unsettled when Marcellus, recovering from his rape ordeal in the basement, announced, “What now? Let me tell you what now: I'm gonna call a couple o' hard, pipe-hittin' niggers, who'll go to work on the ‘homes’ here with a pair of pliers and a blow torch. You hear me talkin', hillbilly boy? I ain't through with you by a damn sight. I'm gonna get medieval on yo' ass.”

This threat, even if it was carried out, was not shown on camera; nonetheless, for me it was the only time I felt the film touched another reality where very bad things happen. Just the mention of a pair of pliers and a blow torch conjured up an image of real suffering that was at odds with the playfulness of the rest of the film.

I don’t think this was done deliberately think it was deliberate. In fact I doubt that most people would not have noticed any change in tone. The line itself is largely lifted from a 1973 film and I suspect Tarantino just saw it as part of his melange of homage, cool and baroque violence. I guess it’s just that we all have different triggers and sensitivities.

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jeremy
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 5:59 am Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 6794 Location: Derby, England and Hamilton, New Zealand (yes they are about 12,000 miles apart)
Good list Tim. I'd also add Trainspotting and two children's films, Beauty And The Beast and Toy Story. If made in Europe or Japan, I'm sure we'd be calling these last two masterpieces. The Coen's also need a mention, not so much for any one film, but for creating what amounts to their own genre - the quirky, nineties noir.

Finally, I'd risk brickbats here by praising Shakespeare In Love.


Last edited by jeremy on Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:43 am; edited 1 time in total

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I am angry, I am ill, and I'm as ugly as sin.
My irritability keeps me alive and kicking.
I know the meaning of life, it doesn't help me a bit.
I know beauty and I know a good thing when I see it.
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Mr. Brownstone
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:34 am Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 2450
I've never understood the anomisity for Shakespeare in Love, although I suspect it has something to do with Gwyneth's daddy being friends with the Weinsteins more than anything else.

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Trish
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:50 am Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 2438 Location: Massachusetts
Marc wrote:
Lets begin a discussion on Pulp Ficton next Monday, June 5. That gives everyone the weekend to re-watch the movie. I really don't think this forum will need much moderation. I am willing to keep it moving and on topic.

Lets come up with 4 more films to discuss. I suggest that instead of each society member listing 4 films, that we each pick one or two films and from the resulting collection of picks we choose 4. Of course, other films will enter these discussions. In talking about PULP FICTION, I am sure RESERVOIR DOGS will come up. As wellas all the films that PULP FICTION inspired, including crap like BOONDOCK SAINTS and decent films like LOCK, STOCK AND TWO SMOKING BARRELS.

My two: NAKED and FIGHT CLUB.


My Two are The Grifters and What's Eating Gilbert Grape

(runner ups - Muriel's Wedding and Croupier or This Boy's Life)


Last edited by Trish on Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:55 am; edited 1 time in total
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Trish
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:53 am Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 2438 Location: Massachusetts
Mr. Brownstone wrote:
I've never understood the anomisity for Shakespeare in Love, although I suspect it has something to do with Gwyneth's daddy being friends with the Weinsteins more than anything else.


I agree its a delightful film
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Ghulam
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:13 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 4731 Location: Upstate NY
Thanks Marj and Tim for mentioning Glegarry Glen Ross. I enjoyed it a lot, even if it felt like a film of a stage production. Wonderful performances.
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chillywilly
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:33 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 8250 Location: Salt Lake City
Mr. Brownstone wrote:
I've never understood the anomisity for Shakespeare in Love, although I suspect it has something to do with Gwyneth's daddy being friends with the Weinsteins more than anything else.

I'm with you and Trish on this. Loved the film. Very enjoyable.

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ehle64
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:40 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 7149 Location: NYC; US&A
Couldn't stand Shakespeare in Love -- most contrived Stoppard, ever.

I guess 1999 is the cutoff date? Too bad because from 2000:




Criterion Release on July 11th.

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Ghulam
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:59 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 4731 Location: Upstate NY
SIL, not bad, but overrated.
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jeremy
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 9:10 am Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 6794 Location: Derby, England and Hamilton, New Zealand (yes they are about 12,000 miles apart)
I don't think Shakespeare In Love it can be called overrated, most of the cognoscenti look down on it. I think it attracts a lot of derision from those who seem to think we can learn most about the human condition from trawling the American underworld.

As ehle says SIL is contrived and it is also about as historically grounded as Brigadoon. But for me that is part of its attraction. I enjoy its cleverness for its own sake and perhaps, like Moulin Rouge , its lack of seriousness allows it to rise above the mundane and to hint at...besides it's a comedy.

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I am angry, I am ill, and I'm as ugly as sin.
My irritability keeps me alive and kicking.
I know the meaning of life, it doesn't help me a bit.
I know beauty and I know a good thing when I see it.
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dlhavard
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 9:15 am Reply with quote
Joined: 24 May 2004 Posts: 1352 Location: Detroit (where the slow are run over)
I may be in the minority but I thought SIL was a much better film than Elizabeth - which took itself way too seriously.

Always thought of SIL as a romantic comedy with a touch of fantasy.

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billyweeds
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 9:25 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20552 Location: New York City
dlhavard wrote:
I may be in the minority but I thought SIL was a much better film than Elizabeth - which took itself way too seriously.

Always thought of SIL as a romantic comedy with a touch of fantasy.


I agree about everything. Shakespeare in Love is better than Elizabeth. The cognoscenti do look down on it. And it's overrated: it won the Oscar over the far superior Saving Private Ryan.

Everything.
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jeremy
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 9:29 am Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 6794 Location: Derby, England and Hamilton, New Zealand (yes they are about 12,000 miles apart)
But it had better jokes.

_________________
I am angry, I am ill, and I'm as ugly as sin.
My irritability keeps me alive and kicking.
I know the meaning of life, it doesn't help me a bit.
I know beauty and I know a good thing when I see it.
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marantzo
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 9:43 am Reply with quote
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mo_flixx wrote:
I am a huge fan of the '90's films of John Dahl -

"Red Rock West"
"The Last Seduction" and others.

What a stylist!


John Dahl just wrapped up shooting a film in Winnipeg called You Kill Me. Dennis Farina, and Ben Kingsley among others. Kingsley threw out the first pitch to start the Winnipeg Goldeyes season. Kingsley plays a drunken hitman.

It's so much fun the drive around the Winnipeg streets and see the ones that are cordoned off for film shoots. And if I were not such a stay-at-home I'd have seen, who so many have, big stars at the restaurants and bars. Every production company that has filmed here has been effusive in their praise, of the film crews and the people and the city itself. One thing that keeps coming up in interviews is that when the people in the movie hear that they are shooting in Winnipeg, they think things like "oh my God, no!' And they end up thinking that it was a great decision. I can't help it, I'm immensely proud of my city.
Syd
Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2006 10:05 am Reply with quote
Site Admin Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 12640 Location: Norman, Oklahoma
ehle64 wrote:
Couldn't stand Shakespeare in Love -- most contrived Stoppard, ever.

I guess 1999 is the cutoff date? Too bad because from 2000:




I had to check the release date on that myself. If we were doing 1991-2000 Yi Yi would be #3 on my list.

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