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yambu
Posted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 7:31 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 23 May 2004 Posts: 6441 Location: SF Bay Area
Marilyn wrote:
High Noon was discussed extensively in the Zinnemann specialty forum.
Dammit, she's right. I just went there, and the discussion was exhaustive. HN is five films away, so we have time to discuss this, but, reluctantly, I'm leaning toward pulling it. I would want to replace it with a '50's film. Rio Bravo gets strong marks from some of you, but do we really want three John Waynes in this first batch? A James Stewart would not be out of line. I loved Winchester 73 as a kid. Likewise, The Man from Laramie. Then there's The Far Country and Bend of the River. Based solely on reviews I've read today, Bend seems to be the best of the bunch. I'll try to pick it up tomorrow.
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yambu
Posted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 7:34 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 23 May 2004 Posts: 6441 Location: SF Bay Area
Melody wrote:
Thanks for rounding us up, Yambu. I'm ready to ride! When do we cross Red River?
As I said above, as soon as five people tell me thay're ready, we'll start. If this system doesn't work out, we'll go back to picking a date certain.
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Marj
Posted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 8:40 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 10497 Location: Manhattan
Nancy wrote:
Finally found where I posted this in Silents, so I could recycle it here. Although we're not going back as far as this decade, Hart is worth checking out:

So, fellow silent film fans, how do the rest of you feel about William S. Hart's silent Westerns? I was just reading about him, and feel the need to watch one of them again. I first heard about him in film class, where we saw his last film (and one of his best), Tumbleweeds. Hart's films have a curiously modern feel to them; they have a sense of realism most silent Westerns lack. Hart plays a hero a lot like Gary Cooper, and even Clint Eastwood -- the strong silent (no joke intended) type. He often plays an outlaw reformed by the love of a Good Woman. The stunts in his films can be pretty impressive -- I recall him jumping a horse over an overturned wagon in one film. And when he has a saloon fight, it's not the Bonanza-style farce with breakaway everything. The costuming is pretty good, too. Clothes look like they've actually been worn, and the women's costumes are often more historically accurate than was usual for this period. If you haven't seen any Hart movies, you have a treat in store. Hunt them down -- Tumbleweeds is not too hard to find, and The Narrow Trail and Hell's Hinges are also quite good.


Nancy - I must admit I've never been a fan of westerns. I don't know why. But I would be very up for trying William S. Hart.
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Nancy
Posted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 9:39 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 4607 Location: Norman, OK
Marj wrote:
Nancy - I must admit I've never been a fan of westerns. I don't know why. But I would be very up for trying William S. Hart.


Oh, please do, Marj. I think you'll like his films. (I certainly do.) They set up a lot of the Western conventions that show up in so many later movies. See if you can find Tumbleweeds -- it's his last film, and a pretty good one.

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Ghulam
Posted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 10:01 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 4723 Location: Upstate NY
The ones I would like to see now are the spaghetti westerns. Which two of them would stand out above the rest?
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yambu
Posted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 10:48 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 23 May 2004 Posts: 6441 Location: SF Bay Area
WhoooWEE! I just watched Red River. Gorgeous, is all I should say right now.
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yambu
Posted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 11:14 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 23 May 2004 Posts: 6441 Location: SF Bay Area
Nancy wrote:
.....If you haven't seen any Hart movies, you have a treat in store. Hunt them down -- Tumbleweeds is not too hard to find, and The Narrow Trail and Hell's Hinges are also quite good.
Very interesting, Nance. A little later on, we should take you up on this.
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Marj
Posted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 12:23 am Reply with quote
Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 10497 Location: Manhattan
Nancy wrote:
Marj wrote:
Nancy - I must admit I've never been a fan of westerns. I don't know why. But I would be very up for trying William S. Hart.


Oh, please do, Marj. I think you'll like his films. (I certainly do.) They set up a lot of the Western conventions that show up in so many later movies. See if you can find Tumbleweeds -- it's his last film, and a pretty good one.


Thanks Nance. It's going on my queue.

And Ghulam - This is my chance to see a spagetti western. I never have. But I'll wait for a good referral since clearly I know nothing about them. Were these the films that were scored by Ennio Morricone?


Last edited by Marj on Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:07 am; edited 1 time in total
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marantzo
Posted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 12:51 am Reply with quote
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Yes.
Marilyn
Posted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 9:55 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 8210 Location: Skokie (not a bad movie, btw)
yambu wrote:
I would want to replace it with a '50's film.


I would suggest a western with a difference. Forty Guns, directed by Douglas Sirk, is a hoot and a half and a very good film starring Barbara Stanwyck.

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yambu
Posted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 10:04 am Reply with quote
Joined: 23 May 2004 Posts: 6441 Location: SF Bay Area
Ghulam wrote:
The ones I would like to see now are the spaghetti westerns. Which two of them would stand out above the rest?
i don't think we'll be doing the spaghetti's here. As Mo said, they're almost a separate genre. I already have a list of about thirty films, compiled from posts, that deserve discussion. Except for a possible dip back to a William S. Hart silent (I need to check on availability), we'll be culling the list that I have, and proceeding decade by decade.
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yambu
Posted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 10:14 am Reply with quote
Joined: 23 May 2004 Posts: 6441 Location: SF Bay Area
Marilyn wrote:
yambu wrote:
I would want to replace it with a '50's film.


I would suggest a western with a difference. Forty Guns, directed by Douglas Sirk, is a hoot and a half and a very good film starring Barbara Stanwyck.
That's the one where she cracks the whip, right? "C'mon, boyz." I dunno. I would consider a groundswell for it.
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Marc
Posted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 1:23 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 19 May 2004 Posts: 8423
Forty Guns, directed by Douglas Sirk.

It was directed by Sam Fuller.
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Marilyn
Posted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 1:59 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 8210 Location: Skokie (not a bad movie, btw)
Yes, right. It's so campy I thought it was Sirk.

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mo_flixx
Posted: Sat Mar 18, 2006 9:42 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 30 May 2004 Posts: 12533
Here's some input on the substitution for HIGH NOON.

I've seen all the films yambu's selected except one, but I doubt that I'll be able to participate much here (until later) because of travel plans.

I like the idea of James Stewart...and not more John Wayne. I've checked out the James Stewart/Anthony Mann films - all classics -- on the imdb.com. Here's the list:
"Bend of the River"
"Far Country"
"Naked Spur"
"Winchester '73"
One of these might make a good choice.

As for Douglas Sirk, he did direct some westerns - "Taza, Son of Cochise" with Jeff Chandler. There is also another Taza picture, too. Esoteric - but if it's Sirk, it's bound to be interesting.

P.S.
Fuller did that Jesse James movie, too. Back to the imdb.com to get the title.
I'm very fond of some of Raoul Walsh's westerns - especially "The Pursued" (a noir western) with Robert Mitchum at his finest.
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