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gromit
Posted: Mon Dec 02, 2019 11:41 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 31 Aug 2004 Posts: 8620 Location: Shanghai
I think the right approach is just let the mood and feel of the film wash over you (mostly because the themes are half-baked and the dialogue weirdly poor).

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bartist
Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 10:22 am Reply with quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010 Posts: 6456
Thanks. I had to bail after a hour (I think George Clooney's dildo machine in Burn After Reading got retrofitted for this film) - more due to fatigue from shoveling seventeen inches of snow (you heard that right) than unwillingness to continue. Will let it wash over me again tonight. Uck.

Later: Well, pretty much what the mouthless dog reported. There were a few interesting moments in the second half (that managed to, briefly, not be about body fluids) interspersed with nonsensical science and character interactions that stirred no sympathy or really any interest in these interstellar guinea pigs. A lot of indecipherable dialog and events and then, maybe 15 years later, a sort of interesting movie begins, concerning a father and 15 year old daughter confronting the mystery of a black hole. This movie lasts about 15 minutes and makes no pretense of plot resolution or explaining their ultimate fate as they traverse a shining yellow band of plasma or whatever it is.

Watching Cleo tonight to, I hope, get the taste of High Life out of my cinematic mouth.

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gromit
Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2019 2:25 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 31 Aug 2004 Posts: 8620 Location: Shanghai
Yeah, High Life is just a mess and a muddle and basically a poor film.
I think Claire Denis is a poor (or at least very flawed) filmmaker.

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gromit
Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2019 2:31 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 31 Aug 2004 Posts: 8620 Location: Shanghai
Cahiers Top Ten of the ending decade we reside in.

1. Twin Peaks : The Return de David Lynch (2017)
2. Holy Motors de Leos Carax (2012)
3. P’tit Quinquin de Bruno Dumont
4. Oncle Boonmee d’Apichatpong Weerasethakul (2010)
5. Le Livre d’Image de Jean-Luc Godard (2018)
6. Toni Erdmann de Maren Ade (2016)
7. Mia Madre de Nanni Moretti (2015)
8. Melancholia de Lars von Trier (2011)
9. Under The Skin de Jonathan Glazer (2013)
10.L’Étrange Affaire Angélica de Manoel de Oliveira (2010)

I've only seen half (with #'s bolded above).

I thought Uncle Boomee was comically bad.
And Toni Erdmann not far behind. Really disliked TE.
Found Holy Motors a big yawn
Petit Quinquin was fairly average, but not memorable.
Melancholia had potential, but squandered it and became tedious and boring.

Terrible list.

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gromit
Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2019 2:34 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 31 Aug 2004 Posts: 8620 Location: Shanghai
Here's another list mainly of films I didn't see:
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/10-best-films-decade-1260056/item/1-carlos-2010-10-best-films-decade-1260057

Social Network was fine enough. But I can't remember a thing about it.

Only Lovers Left Alive was a complete vacuous snooze.

Inside Llewyn Davis is a genuinely good film (if a little slight).
That could make a list of mine.
I must have such a list around here.
Think I posted it last month ...

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gromit
Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2019 2:41 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 31 Aug 2004 Posts: 8620 Location: Shanghai
I'll need to check if it needs to updated, but this is what my computer tells me were my favorites of the 2010's:

1. Rabbit Hole
2. Margaret
3. Birdman
4. The Artist
5. Nader and Simin, A Separation
6. Paterson

7. Boyhood
8. The Wind Journeys
9. Katalin Varga
10. Young Adult
11. Teddy Bear
12. 5 Broken Cameras


Mine goes to 11.
I wanted to squeeze in a doc which happened to be residing at 11.
Should be other docs on my list (which in full goes up to 24).

Edit: Added in Paterson, so now mine goes up to 12 . . .

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billyweeds
Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:38 am Reply with quote
Joined: 20 May 2004 Posts: 20426 Location: New York City
gromit wrote:
Here's another list mainly of films I didn't see:
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/10-best-films-decade-1260056/item/1-carlos-2010-10-best-films-decade-1260057

Social Network was fine enough. But I can't remember a thing about it.

Only Lovers Left Alive was a complete vacuous snooze.

Inside Llewyn Davis is a genuinely good film (if a little slight).
That could make a list of mine.
I must have such a list around here.
Think I posted it last month ...


This list includes my favorite film of the decade and what is probably my least favorite. What are they? Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood and Mad Max: Fury Road respectively.
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bartist
Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 4:12 pm Reply with quote
Joined: 27 Apr 2010 Posts: 6456
Getting back briefly to the list of meilleure realisatrices, finally saw Cleo de 5 à 7. Outstanding Left Bank school slice of life, beautiful camera work (the use of mirrors in the hat shop and elsewhere, showing how her shallow preoccupations over how others see her plays out....then shifts away from the reflected images to greater existential awareness of her real self...), and substantial reflection on how we are led by others, like doctors who (neatly paralleled by Tarot card reading at the opening of the film) give tests and feign an authoritative certainty over our choices and fate. Or the pianist (Michel LeGrand cameo!) who seems confident there's no need to teach Cleo to read music. Varda finds clever ways to mock the complacency of men who seem to think they know what's good for women. The scene where Cleo (with her new Algerian soldier pal) arrives at Salpetriere, and gets a "drive by" test result and diagnosis ("a couple months of chemo and you'll be fine") is darkly comic and strikingly fresh even in 2019. And, one other observation - a skilfully shot drive through Paris, which further proclaims Varda's liberation from a studio and backlot milieu. A film that reminds of the photographic excitement that the FNW brought to the film universe.

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Syd
Posted: Thu Dec 12, 2019 10:38 pm Reply with quote
Site Admin Joined: 21 May 2004 Posts: 12543 Location: Norman, Oklahoma
Cleo is one of my favorite films. I love how her friendship with the Algerian soldier develops.

I'm watching Amazing Grace, the Aretha Franklin gospel concert film from 1971 that was not completed due to technical problems you can see in the film. Mostly sound mixing problems and people complaining about film credits. Still valuable as a historical record, and she has some powerful performances. It's great to see Aretha at the peak of her powers. They finally get straightened out around 1:20 point and she blew me away.

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